World War 2 games have been extremely overdone, but if you want to compare this to Battlefield 1, it's an absolute joke. This is in no wayWorld War 2 games have been extremely overdone, but if you want to compare this to Battlefield 1, it's an absolute joke. This is in no way accurate to the actual WW 2, almost as inaccurate as Cod WW2, and shoves political agenda down your throat. A rather bad and forgettable installment into the Battlefield franchise.… Expand


DEPARTED, MEXICO: Set in a rural Mexican town amidst the Dia de los Muertos (the Day of the Dead) celebration, this medium-sized map features a classic three-lane design. PHAROAH, EGYPT: The abandoned archeological site of an ancient Egyptian palace, this complex multi-level map includes flesh-eating scarabs. MUTINY, CARIBBEAN: secretive cove on a remote Caribbean island, harbors an eerie moored pirate ship hideout. FAVELA, BRAZIL: Players traverse from one building to the other, using ramshackle scaffolding to create multiple pathways between structures. 
Time To Kill. Goodness, it's quick. My firefights against most players is roughly 0.5-1.0 seconds. This is why the ammunition limit doesn't feel like such a crutch. You can kill almost anyone in 5-7 bullets (less if you're aiming at the head). Sure, it's a little more realism, but it makes the ammunition limit almost silly. Furthermore, if you don't know where your attacker is coming from, you're dead before you can actualize the target. In some cases, this is warranted, but in others, you're left thinking, "WHAT? WHERE? HOW?!" and dead before the words reach your lips. As a support, plopping my MG32 or Bren on a bipod already makes things easy. The good thing is DICE is already working on a TTK fix, so deletions will be less common.
The #1 WWII shooter development team returns with an amazing new experience: Developed by Infinity Ward, creators of the award-winning Call of Duty. All-new, unprecedented enhancements from stunningly realistic graphics to seamless gameplay, thanks to the revolutionary COD2 engine, groundbreaking AI, and choice-based gameplay innovations. Beautifully rendered snow, rain, fog, and smoke, combined with dynamic lighting and shadows, make this the most intense WWII shooter yet.
Blackout, The mode that most of the development time went into. Chasing the trends with popular games like Pubg and Fortnite. But it’s actually really well made. Call of Duty manage to transfer there fast paced gameplay in a BR mode. This hands down the best first person Battle Royale game on consoles period. Call of Duty Black Out has 100 players dropping in a map from various multiplayer and zombie maps and it just works for me. There have been people running into issues but lucky in my experience nothing but smooth sailing. You can unlock various black ops characters with challenges. The mode is a lot of fun and it went from being scorned as a cheap cash grab to being the best thing Call of Duty has done since Black Ops 2. Great job Treyarch for beating the skeptics. However the game is not perfect.

The game introduced a new take on AI-controlled allies who support the player during missions and react to situational changes during gameplay. This led to a greater emphasis on squad-based play as opposed to the "lone wolf" approach often portrayed in earlier first-person shooter games. Much of Infinity Ward's development team consisted of members who helped develop Medal of Honor: Allied Assault.
The first mission in the Soviet campaign occurs during the Battle of Stalingrad on September 18, 1942. Corporal Alexei Ivanovich Voronin, a young volunteer, and his fellow recruits are sent across the Volga River, many of whom are subsequently killed when the Luftwaffe launch an attack. Once across, Voronin is given a small amount of bullets, which he gives to a fellow soldier so he can cover an officer calling in an artillery strike that forces the Germans back. The second mission begins in Red Square with Soviet officers killing soldiers who retreat (see Joseph Stalin's Order No. 227—"Not one step back!"). Voronin gets his hands on a rifle and kills several German officers, disrupting the German offense long enough for Soviet artillery to destroy their tanks. In the next mission, Voronin links up with his surviving allies in a train station and must guide them to Major Zubov of the 13th Guards Rifle Division. For his actions, Voronin is promoted to Junior Sergeant. The fourth mission, on November 9, has Voronin moving through the sewers to help retake an apartment building in German hands. The following fifth mission has Voronin's unit, led by Sergeant Pavlov, assaulting the building (see Pavlov's House). Voronin acts as a counter-sniper while another soldier draws the fire of the snipers in the building; the unit then clears the building of Germans and defends it from a German counterattack.
This is what people really want to know about so here's my take... It feels like how BF1 should have been at launch if it were a WW2 game. That's not to say there aren't kinks, but the point is DICE seems to have taken a lot from what they've learned from BF1 and applied it immediately at launch to BFV. Here's some things that stuck out to me (in no good or bad order)

This just seems like a particular “at risk” year for EA and Battlefield, given its steep competition. Granted that kind of happens every fall, but alternating Battlefield and Battlefront releases, this seems like it maybe should have been time for the latter just to stand out a little bit more, but that’s not how production schedules work. EA will always have FIFA and Madden and such to lean on, but I do think its shooter series are becoming less relevant as time goes on. Perhaps a game like Anthem will change that, but I don’t think Battlefield V will.
The mode has squads of four trying to hunt down each other and complete objectives to be the last standing on a map shrinking as it’s consumed by a ring of fire (not going to ask what Nazi superweapon has supposedly created that). But the mode is limited to 64 players when Blackout has now been pushed to 88 and Fortnite is always at 100. And 64 players is not exactly a new prospect for the Battlefield series, which has been doing the big team thing for a while now. There also does not appear to be a solos or duos option for Firestorm, at least at launch, which is a significant departure from other BRs where that’s standard. This is in contrast to Call of Duty where Blackout plays wildly different from traditional multiplayer, in playercount, map size, vehicle use, everything.
You know the old saying... if you've seen one, you've seen them all? Well that sure applies to the call of duty series. Every game after modern warfare 1 seems like a COD add-on mission pack, same engine, same old arcade style shoot-em-up action, only thing different between MW 1, 2, 3, World at War and now these Black Ops games is the maps. The enemies all act the same, the guns all feel the same...no innovation whatsoever. I'm not trying to insult fans of this series, COD is like a religion to some those gamers and I'm sure I'd be accused of blasphemy. Activision has found a product that makes them a lot of money and I can't really blame them for churning out more of the same because people keep on buying it. But I'll never buy another COD game again unless they come up with something really new and innovative, but as long as people keep shelling out the bucks for this crap, that will probably be a long time from now.
With exceptional outfits and assignments for the British Special Air Service and the German Airborne troops, Battlefield™ V Deluxe Edition will make you stand out on the battlefield with five sets of paratrooper apparel containing weapon skins, camo patterns, head gear, and face paint. Plus, Battlefield V Deluxe Edition lets you test your skill in bonus Starter Assignments and get regular customization items thanks to the weekly Airlift system.
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