Call of Duty is a video game based on id Tech 3, and was released on October 29, 2003. The game was developed by Infinity Ward and published by Activision. The game simulates the infantry and combined arms warfare of World War II.[2] An expansion pack, Call of Duty: United Offensive, was developed by Gray Matter Interactive with contributions from Pi Studios and produced by Activision. The game follows American and British paratroopers and the Red Army. The Mac OS X version of the game was ported by Aspyr Media. In late 2004, the N-Gage version was developed by Nokia and published by Activision. Other versions were released for PC, including Collector's Edition (with soundtrack and strategy guide), Game of the Year Edition (includes game updates), and the Deluxe Edition (which contains the United Offensive expansion and soundtrack; in Europe the soundtrack was not included). On September 22, 2006, Call of Duty, United Offensive, and Call of Duty 2 were released together as Call of Duty: War Chest for PC.[3] Since November 12, 2007, Call of Duty games have been available for purchase via Valve's content delivery platform Steam.[4]
The sixth mission occurs much later, on January 17, 1945, with Voronin now a full Sergeant, serving with the 150th Rifle Division of the 3rd Shock Army. The unit secures a makeshift German tank repair facility in Warsaw in the midst of the Vistula–Oder Offensive. The seventh mission takes place shortly after, with the unit moving to regroup with the 4th Guards Tank Army. Due to shortages in experienced soldiers, the eighth mission, on January 26, requires Voronin to command a T-34-85 tank for the 2nd Guards Tank Army. In a full scale offense, the Soviets capture a town near the Oder River. The ninth mission is also fought in the tank, with Voronin eliminating all surviving German units in the town.
Weapon Progression. It's small and this is a detractor for me. Where games like BF3 and BF4 had a wide variety of grips, sights, barrels, attachments etc that affected the overall potency of a weapon, in BFV, you can change the scope on a gun then the rest is in the progression system which isn't mix and match. Some follow very linear build patterns where if you choose one progression for a gun, you have to take the next one in the chain. Granted, this helps make it so certain weapon progression combinations don't make you God, but it detracts from what I really liked about BF3 and BF4 weapon customizations. Can I live with this system? Yeah. Do I want a little more variety? Absolutely.
Spotting. I don't know the full mechanics how this works, but I've seen very few markers above enemy's heads for their location. Muzzle flare, bullets, map markers and direct line of sight have been my spotting methods. People may be able to have better takes on the spotting systems (like Recon players) than I will, but overall I don't feel like the enemy has constant knowledge of where I am. Someone please comment how spotting works and I'll edit it into this section here with your name referenced.
Call of Duty: Black Ops is the seventh installment in the series,[27][28][29] the third developed by Treyarch, and was published by Activision for release on November 9, 2010. It is the first game in the series to take place during the Cold War and also takes place partially in the Vietnam War. It was initially available for Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360, and PlayStation 3 and was later released for the Wii as well as the Nintendo DS.[30]

Black Ops is back! Featuring gritty, grounded Multiplayer combat, the biggest Zombies offering ever with three full undead adventures at launch, and Blackout, where the universe of Black Ops comes to life in a massive battle royale experience. Blackout features the largest map in Call of Duty history, signature Black Ops combat, and characters, locations and weapons from the Black Ops series.
DEPARTED, MEXICO: Set in a rural Mexican town amidst the Dia de los Muertos (the Day of the Dead) celebration, this medium-sized map features a classic three-lane design. PHAROAH, EGYPT: The abandoned archeological site of an ancient Egyptian palace, this complex multi-level map includes flesh-eating scarabs. MUTINY, CARIBBEAN: secretive cove on a remote Caribbean island, harbors an eerie moored pirate ship hideout. FAVELA, BRAZIL: Players traverse from one building to the other, using ramshackle scaffolding to create multiple pathways between structures. 
Sprinting While Crouched. I friggin' love this feature. You can now keep your head low and your noise making just above crouch walking and sprint. This is super cool. The animation team also did a good work (at least for Support) on the position of your gun to let you know what stance you're in. It helps you cover ground while keeping a low profile and, in some scenarios, this massively gives you an edge on sneaking around points. You can only sprint in forward movements (which makes sense) at which point crouching backwards makes you pretty slow (which can be a danger if you get spotted). Well done on this one, DICE!

In 2006, Treyarch released Call of Duty 3, their first Call of Duty game of the main series. Treyarch and Infinity Ward signed a contract stating that the producer of each upcoming title in the series would alternate between the two companies. In 2010, Sledgehammer Games announced they were working on a main series title for the franchise. This game was postponed in order to help Infinity Ward produce Modern Warfare 3. In 2014, it was confirmed that Sledgehammer Games would produce the 2014 title, Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare, and the studios would begin a three-year rotation.[38][39] Advanced Warfare was followed by Treyarch's Call of Duty: Black Ops III in 2015, Infinity Ward's Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare in 2016, Sledgehammer Games's Call of Duty: WWII in 2017 and was followed by Treyarch's Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 in 2018.


The game introduced a new take on AI-controlled allies who support the player during missions and react to situational changes during gameplay. This led to a greater emphasis on squad-based play as opposed to the "lone wolf" approach often portrayed in earlier first-person shooter games. Much of Infinity Ward's development team consisted of members who helped develop Medal of Honor: Allied Assault.
The first mission in the Soviet campaign occurs during the Battle of Stalingrad on September 18, 1942. Corporal Alexei Ivanovich Voronin, a young volunteer, and his fellow recruits are sent across the Volga River, many of whom are subsequently killed when the Luftwaffe launch an attack. Once across, Voronin is given a small amount of bullets, which he gives to a fellow soldier so he can cover an officer calling in an artillery strike that forces the Germans back. The second mission begins in Red Square with Soviet officers killing soldiers who retreat (see Joseph Stalin's Order No. 227—"Not one step back!"). Voronin gets his hands on a rifle and kills several German officers, disrupting the German offense long enough for Soviet artillery to destroy their tanks. In the next mission, Voronin links up with his surviving allies in a train station and must guide them to Major Zubov of the 13th Guards Rifle Division. For his actions, Voronin is promoted to Junior Sergeant. The fourth mission, on November 9, has Voronin moving through the sewers to help retake an apartment building in German hands. The following fifth mission has Voronin's unit, led by Sergeant Pavlov, assaulting the building (see Pavlov's House). Voronin acts as a counter-sniper while another soldier draws the fire of the snipers in the building; the unit then clears the building of Germans and defends it from a German counterattack.
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